Substitution

The use of substitution in ICT is essentially using computer technology to perform the same task that was done before the use of computers (“SAMR Model – Technology Is Learning”, 2018).

An example of this would be substituting a physical book and worksheets to a virtual and interactive copy of the text through the use of an application such as Notability. An activity with the use of this app involve students accessing the uploaded document on their own device, and are then able to take notes over the text and answer any questions or activities provided by the teacher. The use of this app is an effective ICT learning activity as the work completed by students is automatically saved to their server alleviating the problem of ‘lost work’. The use of ICT in this context also removes printing and photocopying multiple worksheets that students must then cut & paste into their workbooks. The only downfall of this app is that student work cannot be viewed from the teacher’s device requiring the teacher to collect student devices to mark work.

Students completing an assignment that requires them to provide an overview of information as hand written content with images from magazines can be substituted to an ICT activity through presentation software (such as PowerPoint or Prezi) to construct a presentation with the same information. Allowing students to use ICT to complete an activity such as this not only provides students with opportunities to develop their research and referencing skills, but also reduces the inconvenience of not finding the image they desire in magazines or worry about their work getting lost. Students’ work is saved to their user’s server & is easily delivered to the teacher for marking through email or Airdrop.

Substitution ICT Lesson Plan

Walsh, K. (2015). 8 Examples of Transforming Lessons Through the SAMR Cycle | Emerging Education Technologies. Retrieved from https://www.emergingedtech.com/2015/04/examples-of-transforming-lessons-through-samr/

SAMR Model – Technology Is Learning. (2018). Retrieved from https://sites.google.com/a/msad60.org/technology-is-learning/samr-model

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